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        *** NEW AWARD*** 

 My book ETHICAL CHIC: The Inside Story of the Companies We Think We Love

was named one of the Best Books of 2012 by Library Journal

http://reviews.libraryjournal.com/2012/12/best-of/best-books-2012-business/

This book analyzes six well-known companies that are seen as socially responsible and hip, to see if they really deserve their sterling reputations.

Find out the real story about Starbucks, Apple, Trader Joe’s, American Apparel, Tom’s of Maine and Timberland:.

*************************************************

I am a prize-winning author and journalist with over 20 years of experience specializing in health care, retirement issues, and the nexus between business and public policy. I write regularly for The New York Times, Newsday, The Scientist, Institutional Investor, and more

Nazis Are Bad: OK, That’s a Start Toward Rebuilding Community

The New York Times, August 19, 2017

It’s nice to know that divided America — Red, Blue, Purple, black, white, the whole rainbow —  or at least about 95% of the rainbow — can agree on one point that I thought had actually been settled by Dec. 7, 1941, when the U.S. entered World War Two: Nazis are bad. Even Fox News and CNN agree. James Murdoch and George Soros, please shake hands. Of course, that’s a bit like saying 95% of Americans agree that the Earth revolves around the Sun. (Whether the revolving is because of Nature or God, however, fewer than 50% of Americans would probably agree — and Donald Trump, of course, thinks both Earth and Sun revolve around him.) How can we build from there? What tiny stones of decency and truth can we put on top of that anti-Nazi cornerstone — carefully, losing a few percent with each stone, but nevertheless, perhaps, building something? Thou shalt not kill, except in clear cases of self-defense. (We’ve just lost the pro-death penalty and anti-abortion sectors.) Thou shalt not rape. (How do we define date rape? marital rape? “she asked for it” rape?) You should say “please” and “thank you.” (Actually, Icelanders told me that Americans say “thank you” too much — which may, come to think of it, be a defining characteristic of Americans.) Yay! Our second building block!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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